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. the naacp is pressing the u.n. to send observers to monitor this year's elections. the civil rights group believes that the 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes with police. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries. spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crash with another big rig completely unharmed. he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact and amazingly landed right up with barely a scratch. >>> finally, this is the deepest space you have ever seen. the hubble telescope has sent back a picture more than 13 billion light years in the making. it's a college of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> and now here's an early look at how wall street's going to kick off the day. the dow closed at 13,457 after stumbling 101 points yesterday. the s&p dropped 15. the nasdaq tumbled 43. taking a look at overseas traysing this morning. in tokyo, the ni
. >> now to an iconic moment in the civil rights history. 50 years ago, the first african-american student to enroll at the university of mississippi. his place on campus was deeply unpopular among white students. it led to riots so severe president john f. kennedy sent in the national guard to restore order. so 50 years long, how have things changed in america? >> i came back to mississippi in 1960 to launch a war against white supremacy with the intent of destroying it. the color line didn't enter the picture. only citizenship. and the rights and privileges there are and the reality of enjoying them or not enjoying them. and that's the reason why i looked the way i did because i knew the other side of fear that if someone was in the situation where they were afraid and showed no fear it would scare the life out of the other side and i know it was for rear because they were shaking like a leaf on a tree. my job was finished. once i put the president of the united states in the position where he had to use the military might of the united states of america to protect my rights as a citizen
this year's elections. the civil rights group believes up to 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes witholice. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries, health and education as spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crwith another big rig he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact but amazingly landed right up with barely a scratch. >>> and finally, this is the deepest view of space you have ever seen. the hubble telescopeas sent back picture me an 13 billliyearin t ng it's a collage of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> now a first look at this lics.ng's dish of scrambled next month, stevie wonder is among the stars performing at benefit concert for president obama in los angeles. the hollywood reporter also says that on the bill with wonder will be jennifer hudson and kat perry. >>> michael bloomberg is on the nuerneheer in political offi
and committed civil rights violations. assault, battery, intentional infliction of emotional distress, negligent, false impressment and false arrest. the head of the chapter of the naacp says there's a pattern of improper police behavior in the county. >> this year has been an increase in a number of cases where citizens are being handcuffed and brutalized or used in their arrest. >> the lawsuit seeks $3 million. derek. >> lesli, they want your vote, but will they say anything to get it? here at u.s.a. today, they are separating spin from truth during tonight's presidential debate. we'll be here all night long. >>> don't count on using a big portion of the gw parkway this weekend. the national park service says the northbound lanes will be closed between south run and chain bridge. work to stabilize rocks along the roadway will start around 7:15 friday night. but those lanes should reopen by 5:30 monday morning. >>> did you know that some of you may be driving over an endangered landscape every day on your way to work? according to one nonprofit group, that is the case. the cultural landscape
. >>> and the supreme court is back with some big decisions on civil rights that are coming up. a supreme choice is 36 days away. stay with us. [ mother bear ] you're not using too much are you, hon? [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft is so soft you'll have to remind your family they can use less. it's made with extra cushions that are soft and more absorbent. plus you can use four times less. charmin ultra soft. why does my mouth feel dryer than i remember it to be? there are more people taking more medication, so we see people suffering from dry mouth more so. we may see more cavities, bad breath, oral irritation. a dry mouth sufferer doesn't have to suffer. i would recommend biotene. the enzymes in biotene products help supplement enzymes that are naturally in saliva. biotene helps moisten those areas that have become dry. those that are suffering can certainly benefit from biotene. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>>
fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
, georgia. he's urging faith leaders and even civil rights leaders in the african-american community to mobilize their churches to help kids, parents, and teachers find solutions to the problems in education. he says, kids must come first. >> we just have a crisis in our country. in our public education system is not doing well by our children, it's going to take an entire community to say enough is enough. >> johnson wants to level the playing field for all children who operate from a disadvantage, something he's too familiar with. >> and i grow up in a poor neighborhood and the only way to make it out of the community is basketball and got a scholarship to uc berkley. >> and he knows competing and winning, as a nba player with the phoenix suns enjoyed 12 years as one of the top players of the game. during his nba career, jonathan launched st. hope, a nonprofit community development organization to revitalize earn city communities in his hometown of sacramento. >> i didn't have any of my friends with me on college. they were on drugs, you know, in jail or dead. and i remember thinki
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
by a drone. >> hi, i am a holocaust survivor and a civil rights veteran. and what i see happening in this country as they move towards fascism, which very much resembles that of our germany, which silenced pretty much the labor movement, which restrict to voter participation in the media as well. we no longer have the media that takes on the lives that are being spread and that we are being fed on a daily basis. there are very few outlets we can actually read or hear the truth of what is happening in our government. and my fear is that we are going down a really steep and quick ascent into fascism and i think that is very worrisome. and i am a fighter and i have no idea anymore how this can be stopped because i don't see that there is a movement. he says even when it's hopeless, we have to continue to battle, but there doesn't seem to be a cohesive movement like there was in the 60s. do you have any suggestions about how we can go about this or that she would even agree with the aspect of where we are headed. >> if there is enough people who believe that, then at cnn difference in
are involved in the civil rights movement or in the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or about black preachers who've been so involved in american politics. is it only conservative ministers that you object to? >> no. what i object to -- -- what i object to -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek to use the power of government to impose it on others. a minister who is in civil rights or in the conservative movement, because he believes his faith instructs him to do that, i admire. the fact that the faith speaks to us and that we are moral people, hopefully, i accept and rejoice in. it's when you try to use that to undermine the integrity of private political -- or private religious faith and the use of the state is where -- for the most personal decisions in american life -- that's where i draw the line. >> thank you. now, mr. president, rebuttal. >> yes, it's very difficult to rebut, because i find myself in so much agreement with mr. mondale. i, too, want that wall that is in the constitution of separation of chur
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they did not want james meredith there. your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we got to get order up there. that's what we thought was going to happen. >> mr. president, please, why don't you stop -- >> how can i remove him governor when there's a riot in the street and he might step out of the building and something -- let's get order up there and then we can do something. >> we've got to get somebody out there to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know the tone from my aunts and uncles. civil rights went from being important but not a heated issue during his pres
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
years but in virginia specifically not all states are equal. we still fight civil rights in virginia and we have a state where they want to go backward it appears. now the federal government is doing a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services, meaning those federal dollars the come from virginia. to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services to include housing. housing is a critical missing element in recovery so i guess my thought process to samhsa and somehow force the state to discriminate against recovery like they do in virginia and spend some of those dollars on the authentic recovery and support service. that really is the nature of my thought process. by doing so we could really reduce the recidivism and increase recovery. the power to recover people is incredible and to block out the recovery principle from delivering those services, but like i say the state is not going to change but the federal government if you would just make a rule or regulation with those federal -- you have to spend a small amount o
thought stood out. great tape about the civil rights school integration stuff, call with president eisenhower talking about the cuban missile crisis. this was really interesting. kennedy on the optics of sort of being president and how the gop would seize on a photo op and try to take it out of context which doesn't seem like something you would be considering way back in the '60s. let's hear that tape. >> so apparently just as bad even back then. >> i think it was bad back then. there's this tendency to say it's worse than it's ever been. when you look at history all the way back to the founding you realize people were getting beat in the head with kaines on the senate floor and it's always been bad. that said i think kennedy was particularly astute when it came to optics and concerned with it. he was the first modern president in that regard, the one that came of age and owed his exe -- election to some extent to television. he was seeing it as a stage that had to be set and you see that reflected in those comments. >> now we don't need microphones. we just need juicy tell-all --
, this civil rights attorney told kron 4 haazig madyun that this could raise some serious questions. >> this officer pointed the firearm and he heard 3-4 different gun shots. >> there is conflict in the testimony that the state was given. >> the oakland police department has released the crime report of 18 year-old bluuferd, the statement from the witnesses of the scene are raising red flags. >> on the on september statements that there was gunfire. perhaps that the 18 year-old fired gunfire however the evidence shows that there's no gunshots fired. and that the gun found near him was not fired. whoever made that statement has been quoted wrong. >> and obviously the fact is that he was not on probation. that probably prompte him to run however, what the family has gone through that he and anny would have pointed a fire arm at an officer. at a time like this. when he said that he has not done anything. in any got shot. >> in oakland haazig madyun kron 4. >>pam: half t statement released with a crime report that " this release is not intended to address all questions and criticisms th
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
was blocked in unprecedented ways. >> caller: civil rights. let me make another civil rights point. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: he is obviously the worst civil rights president we have and this is why -- >> stephanie: oh quite obviously. what? >> caller: because he executed a citizen of the united states without an advocate for the defense. without any judicial involvement, without any judge jury -- >> stephanie: who are you talking about? >> ground strike on the guy who -- >> yes he did. >> caller: let me add one other thing. >> sure. >> caller: we think we know about larky came from the administration so we have no independent information. >> that's not true. the guardian and other places confirmed that's exactly what he did. it was a question of whether or not this was reason enough to do it. now, would you agree that we have had since we've had a standing army, the right to shoot soldiers who go awol in the process? we've had that. >> i would agree with you. >> i'm just saying legally. a command
an economic problem all but it is deeper structure is that it is a civil rights problem. it is wrong. probably constitutionally, to greet a deficit structure which results in a tax necessity which reached out and grab the labor of future children without representation. that is a form of fiscal slavery to read you have reached out and grab their labor to spend it now. who are the but to the advantage? obviously everyone who are -- who benefits from government services and does not so to speak paid their fair share. it might be said there states the receive more than their fair share of government benefits. so there is a benefit by geography. there is one by sector of the economy. he might be -- you might be -- age and income are frequently referred to. they represent degette. that is why it is so difficult for us to close it -- they represent the gap. that is why it is difficult for us to close is carried if i were also a candidate, i want to talk about the solution to the civil problem be to invest in kids. it is difficult to solve this problem without an economy that is doing better. one of
people don't need a lot of living space. >> and activists believe civil rights could be compromised to make way for the housing. >> and did you lose your home in the great recession? still to come how you might qualify for part of a nationwide settlement for homeowner autos looking closely. do you recognize this reporter? coming up a well deserved salute to one of our abc 7 news colleagues. stay with us. >>> president ob krauma told the united nations he's disgusted by the antiislamic movie made by a california man but added bhaiming the united states is also wrong. the movie have become an issue in the race for the white house and abc 7 news is here with the latest on this controversy. >> the president spoke at the un general assembly today. and there is both talking foreign policy. >> at the united nations president obama used the world stage to decry recent u.s. attacks. >> they were attacks on america and should be no doubt we'll be relentless in tracking down killers and bringing them to justice. >> mitt romney hammer the president as what he characterized as the president's re
cannot be paramount. dealing with civil-rights movement, you simply cannot accomplish your goals if you are worried about being sold. john: says segregated lunch counter? >> there is nothing simple about responding to someone making racist comments by raising your voice. or telling them to knock it off. but the government tells you, you cannot do that? that is not a way to run a free society. john: should it be legal to marry the wrong person? or to give a price about nutrition? that and more from north carolina. crop up john: from the university of north carolina at chapel hill, a john stossel. >> not just the and on campus but it is threatened somewhere by somebody in authority. steve works for a medical equipment company but on the side you tried to block about nutrition? >> you given vice and what happened? >> was told by the state i should stop giving nutritional advice. john: they even printed with the red lines. this is why because you give the advice and may not without a license. >> wide why have to tell people to be to meats and vegetables and tell all diabetics to reduce carb
's been established in 2006. office of civil rights is really looking for agencies to have more of a dbe procedures manual, so the changes to the dbe and sbe plans are really just documenting. this is who we are going to advertise with, this is who we are going to outreach to, this is how we are going to conduct a shortfall and et cetera, et cetera. the two major changes are really that they directed that they not use the availability advisory percentage anymore for the dbe program. they believe that that gives the contracting community the impression that there's an enforceable dbe goal on contracts, so we have honored that directive and taken that out of the dbe plan, but we did note for fta we will still have enforceable goals on the small business side and we would be requiring contractors to meet those goals, or demonstrate good faith efforts to meet those goals. the second change the that since we have established our dbe program we have always reported our dbe participation based on all of our contracts. that is how we have calculated our goal for every period. that is how we have
in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campaign read everything they are sent in the mail. they love to meet the candidates and engage in conversations with them. i learned how important it is to build bridges between different communities, particular
there is a problem go to office of civil rights and file a complaint there. they have found ways to get around it. that is what it comes down to. >> thank you. >> sure. >> a 4-year-old girl becoming more than a little helper. >> what she did what saved her mother's live and made her a here yes. >> a flea market find that may be too good to be true. that is why this owner may not have to give it back. >> there is more on the ipad, your prized possession, stolen going through security? there is what we've learned congress is now doing and are online pharmacies the real thing? after his marriage collapsed what we're hearing from arnold schwartzeneggar for the first time today. that is after [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents on their own are wonderful ...but add some ham and cheese ...roll them up in some crescent dough and tada, thursday is now... a ham & cheese crescent roll-up wonder pillsbury crescents, let the making begin. that's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strude
that's played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enact aed by republican-controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to actually change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos. groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there's no fraud in our elections. but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly include eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws only protect against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing states lawyers for both sides include no cases of fraud. still says john fund an expert on the subject. >> if someone walks in and votes the name of a dead person and don't need to show i.d. how likely is that dead person to
. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday night, october 11th, at 9 p.m. eastern daylight time, the vice president, george bush, will debate congresswoman geraldine ferraro in philadelphia. and i hope that you will all watch once again. no matt
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> carmageddon 2 has come to an end just in time for this morning's rush hour in california. the demolition job that shut down a portion of l.a.'s 405 freeway hit a snag when a column collapsed. work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plane 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised money for the special olympics. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love affair with spasm hundreds gathered to build the world's
is inherently unequal. and in the 1960s opening new vistas of civil rights for individuals. and now like much of the nation, polarized and often riven with disaffection while it tends towards what is viewed as conservative world view. the court over its history has given euphoric moments of progress and unfortunate stagnation of the status quo that is desperately needed shaking. but just for clear here's to hoping that justices breyer, ginsberg, society mayor kagan can find the fifth vote that they need to move us forward not backwards. that's my view. on current tv. >>i feel like i don't even know you. >>just stay on your side of the screen, okay? >>brought to you by geico. 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance. visit geico.com for a free rate >> eliot: call it a total and complete failure of the justice system. call it a modern day witch-hunt. call it anything but the way the legal system is supposed to work in this country. it's become a well-known story. in 1993 three children were brutally murdered in the woods of west memphis arkansas. three men who were later to become kno
and demagoguery of the 70's and 80's. the real civil rights battles were over, and then obama brings it all back. gerri: maybe i'm just my youth, but i really believe that having obama as president, as a black american would bring us together, would make things better, would help us feel this issue, moved beyond it, but it has only gotten worse. >> that is why my book is for you because a lot of americans thought that. more white americans voted for obama in 2008 and had voted for any democrat for president in nearly 40 years. obviously a lot of people and that hope. i think seeing him do it himself is what is so arresting about this video, but usually it is being pushed by white liberals. if you don't go for obama america is racist. that statement by romney. and they do it -- they don't care about the historic nature. otherwise they would have been supporting clarence thomas' nomination to the supreme court. they like him because he is the most left-wing president we have ever had, and they can defend his liberal policies by calling his opponents and critics racist >> i want to read the respons
. and that feels right. why not have nice speech? but the civil rights movement and the protests sitting on a lunch hall and refusing to leave on a lunch counter because they're racist, it's important not to be civil all the time. >> bill: if i go down there and i call somebody a pinhead, am i arrested by the campus police? >> you, according to their code, would be kicked out of school. >> bill: is that right? wow! >> probably wouldn't do it for pinhead. >> bill: wow. i bet you they would if it were me. i bet you they would. >> you do much worse. >> bill: the guys in "animal house" they're not going to the university of north carolina. that's not happening. that movie could have never been made if all the colleges had these. >> these codes are since animal house. in response to "animal house." >> bill: tell them time coming down if they don't knock it off. when we come right back, strange twist to a strange case of welfare fraud. the woman who committed it was a big lottery winner and now she's done. legal is next >> bill: i'm bill o'reilly. legal segment, gay marriage, a mysterious death and terro
the alien torched statute. -- alien tort statute. any civil action by agent alien's right toward the only committed and a violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the united states, this is an old statute enacted by the first congress which sat dormant for 170 years. then some civil-rights folks pick them up and they started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and report to a place in some foreign place. they come into in new york federal court and say you have jurisdiction over this and courts have been allowing some of these cases to go forward, strange as it sounds. this case raised the question -- this takes place in nigeria and the guy says he mistreated me, tortured me and so forth. these foreign oil companies were composite and help the nigerian company do this to me -- these companies work implicit. you can actually sue incorporation under this statute and that was their claim last year. the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual -- they actually said to the parties we want to consider a broader q
button topics including same-sex marriage, and a challenge to a key civil rights law, the voting rights act, requiring states with a history of discrimination to get approval from the feds before making any changes to election and voting rules. shannon covers the court for us and is live in washington. shannon, what is left to be settled here? >>guest: well, when it comes to the health care law you will remember back if june the court uphell the individual mandate and rules on other issues involving the expansion of medicaid but there are many other portions of the law the high court did not rule on including the employer mandate. that is one of the elements that the liberty university has been challenging from the going. today the court indicated it is willing to take the issue seriously by giving the administration 30 days to respond to a request by liberty university for a rehearing on that issue. >>shepard: that is one thing. what are the odds it will make it before the court? >>guest: many court watchers who believe the university has a good shot at a second chance. >> they have go
to get ahead of things, the plaintiffs here are attorneys, civil rights activists and others who are in regular contact with people overseas particularly people who might well be the subject of electronic surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give s
that doesn't have civil rights legislation. i have tried to use the white use the pulpit. we have passed two forward civil rights bills. done by legislation, but i do think you need to make an appeal every time you can eliminate racial divisions and discrimination and i'll keep on doing that and pointing to some legislative aaccomplishment. >> i have to point out something else to say to ross perot, please don't say to the dea agents on the street that we don't have the will to fight drugs. please, i've watched these people. the same for our local enforcement people, we are backing up in every way we possibly can. maybe you met that some in the country don't have the will to fight it but we've been a strong backer. i want to clear that up. >> it's time. >> we have the will to fight it and some have let's go to another . subject. the subject of health. the first question to president for two minutes. >> mr. president, tens of thousands of people paradeed pass the white house to demonstrate their concern about the disease aids, a sell brailted member of your commission imagjohnson saying the
about the state of the oakland police department as civil rights opponents attempt to put the police department under state police. the judge overseeing today's hearing had said quan could face punitive action if she did not testify today as she had missed her last court date siting city business. city rights opponents say oakland have failed to follow reform. a federal judge is scheduled to consider the issue in december. >>> all you need is a smart phone to ride munni for free. that's according to a firm that specializes in mobile security. it says it's discovered a flaw in the system. the glitch allows those who are computer savvy to reset the value on muni's system to not pay. >>> the purple onion shut down last night and today remnants of the comedy club went up for sale. items included musical instruments and pictures of the club's old headliners. the purple onion lost its lease after the building was sold. but last night the owner told us he plans to carry out the tradition at other venues around town. >>> that fog is pushing inland right now it's over in berkeley. it's trying
quan testified about the state of the oakland police department as civil rights opponents attempt to put the police department under state police. the judge overseeing today's hearing had said quan could face punitive action if she did not testify today as she had missed her last court date siting city business. city rights opponents say oakland have failed to follow reform. a federal judge is scheduled to consider the issue in december. >>> all you need is a smart phone to ride munni for free. that's according to a firm that specializes in mobile security. it says it's discovered a flaw in the system. the glitch allows those who are computer savvy to reset the value on muni's system to not pay. >>> the purple onion shut down last night and today remnants of the comedy club went up for sale. items included musical instruments and pictures of the club's old headliners. the purple onion lost its lease after the building was sold. but last night the owner told us he plans to carry out the tradition at other venues around town. >>> that fog is pushing inland right now it's over in ber
. that is not good enough. i will look at the back to school bus for and went to topeka, kansas. this is the civil-rights issue of our generation. i am convinced it is not race or class but education and opportunity. if we're serious about closing the achievement gap we have to close the opportunity get. we have had nothing here the sense of urgency and commitment to closing those opportunity gaps that we need to. in brown vs. board five decades ago to look at the staggering inequities, inequality of opportunity by any measure we have to get better faster. all those things compel us to act. the president provided extraordinary leadership and understands what is at stake. congress's current assumption is supportive and we have to look at this together with politics and ideology aside. we have to educate our way to a better economy and vienna different place. how do we get there? a pretty compelling case that that is the best investment we can make. if we put our three and four-year-olds into kindergarten, we start to close the achievement gaps and close the opportunity get. if we don't do that we are cons
in the civil rights movement. others had been working in the movement, and albany since 61. this was 65. nay had -- they had also stard the movement in several other coupes in the area, and i tease him now because the gater had the worst reputation, and he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there, but once my father, who was a leader in the community, was murdered, that was the one thing that really brought everyone together, and they were ready for it when they came in to help us start the baker county movement. >> wow. what's interesting to me is you really -- in the book, you really write about the way the legacy of trauma impacts you as a family so that even though we all know the landmark case, brown versus board of education, but you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children who went to the white school lost all their black friends, couldn't make white friends, and found themselves living in no man's land. i don't think we have the chance to really feel the price that those young folk paid in order for us to be where we are that we get t
a book called "sons of mississippi," the book previous to this, a study of the civil rights south and integration of james meredith at the university of ol miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to the culture history biography. >> and paul's most recent book national book critic circle award finalist. thank you for joining us o up next on booktv mallory factor talks about the power of government employee unions and the impact it's had on policy making. this is just under an hour.
, but it's a pretty dangerous place to be. we need -- we need to have that conversation, the civil rights issue of the 21st century are that, race and poverty, and, of course, education is, indeed, governor romney said it the other day, i had to look at the notes to see i had it right, and the criminal justice system because in addition to the discrimination that violates the law, job discrimination, discrimination in housing and housing finance and so on, we have what we all know in terms of the structural, institutional discrimination of how our schools ordinary reason and opee systemmings and michelle alexander and the new jim crow, published by the new press, has made so clear how our criminal justice system operates. now, that's the basic set of things that we talk about in the book. i also talk, and i won't go into it in great length here, but about poverty in relation to place. our inner cities, app -- appalachia, colonial south texas, all of that because that's where we have the persistent poverty where we have the intergenerational poverty, and it -- i found it very interesting.
smart. ♪ . >> three months after supreme court justice moved to the right and passed obama care. pete williams has some details. >> reporter: larry, this is shaping up to be a court term dominated by civil rights beginning with a case that will be argued next week on affirmative action, colleges nationwide use it believing that a more racially diverse campus provides a better education. the court gave a green light to that practice seven years ago, but since then has become more skeptical. sandra day o'connor who has since left the court. the court will almost certainly hear a challenge to the voting rights act. the section that says states have to get federal permission before they make any changes to their elections if those states have a history of discrimination. the states say the map that's used to determine how they need to get that clearance is out of date and three years ago the court agreed with that. and almost certainly it will take up the challenge to the defense of marriage act. that's the act signed by president clint preside president clinton that says that -- >> many
, for example when after the civil rights movement experienced a deep not only resegregation due to taxes but also an elevation of private schools so people can control their private educational spaces. and so this is a really serious crisis. we can't have a shared democracy if we don't share a robust public fear. education is the critical linchpin to maintaining that space. >> cenk: one more thing professor rose if we were all in the same boat, we might be much better off. you think that in l.a. stephen spielberg's kids, tom hanks' kids all the rich movie producers, if they all had to send their kids to public schools, the public schools wouldn't be much better? >> right, not only would they be much better, but we would be able to understand why schools that hoard resources by controlling high tax bases and leaving poor-tax base with fewer resources we would understand why there is such a differential. working people, working parents working teachers who are workers are paying the price that we're balancing the economy on their backs. until there is collective buy-in its difficult to see
to me from his cowriting the motion. shannon has legal standing because of a civil rights lawsuit he won a decade ago in the so-called riders case. that led to federal monitoring of the department and court- ordered changes he says never came. >> we simply can't wait any longer. that's why we're acting now. >> reporter: he'll file the 50- page brief plus exhibits tomorrow. the motion is scheduled for a hearing in mid december where the city of oakland is expected to fight the request. the latest in the long battle getting to this point is the monitor's just released report, criticizing the department's handling in nine police officer shootings. three of them were fatal. and it warned that some officers might face sanctions. >> i've done police shootings in many cities. but the problems with oakland are systemic and unique. >> reporter: no one from the police department responded to my request for comment today. but chief howard jordan posted this letter to the community. it says when officers fire a weapon, jordan trusts they will act professionally, ethically and with knowledge of the a
. chubby checkers is 71. dave winfield is 61. civil rights activist and tv cable pundit al sharpton is 58. tommy lee is 50. clive owen is 48. no doubt lead singer in phenomenal shape still, queen stefani 43. singer india arie is 37. have a great day, everybody. >>> good morning. welcome back to 9news now. you'll need to give yourself some extra time. the fog is still pretty heavy and thick. >> it will be for another couple three hours or so. later this morning into the afternoon, unlike yesterday i think the sun is going to make it. that will boost temps to the 80s. had a wedge of cold air which has held tight. that's why we have a drizzle and clouds in the afternoon. here's a look at the bus stop forecast. it's foggy and damp out there. radar is nice and quiet as opposed to the pouring rains we had yesterday. temps are mild. want to start with the visibilities and show you that we've got the fog with visibilities quarter mile now at national and dulles. half mile in martinsburg. baltimore quarter mile. got a lot of patchy dense fog. south and east you guys are on the south side of the bo
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
for the new term -- expected to be, civil rights. >>> plus kobe bryant, dropping a little insight on what it's like to play pick-up with the president. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. my brother doesn't look like a heart attack patient. i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i'm a fighter and now i don't have that fear. i'm a fighter you're not just looking for a by house. eyes you're looking for a place for your life to happen. want my recipe for healthier hair color? natural instincts! formulated with aloe, vitamin and antioxidants natural instincts has a system that's a healthier way to radiant color. indulge... with natural instincts. less guilt, more gorgeous. bori
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
brown, diana's co-director of the advancement project, a civil rights organization that filed the lawsuit. thank you for your time. we played that state lawmaker who said if that law was in effect in pennsylvania, he felt that governor romney would win that state, done. the polling shows opposite. nevertheless there was a concern. let's talk about the split decision. the judge is blocking it for now, but what happens next? >> well, you know, this is a big victory for democracy. it paves the way for free, fair, and accessible voting. we know that there were hundreds of thousands of people who would have been impacted by this and would not have had the i.d. we're very pleased that, in fact, in november people can vote without that i.d. we will continue to fight this law because we know that in the end that it impacts elderly voters, young voters and people of color and veterans in the state of pennsylvania. >> what's interesting and the irony we've been talking about is that there was always a great debate that there was no proof of significant voter fraud, not just in pennsylva
years ago. it brought together civil rights leaders then and now. i was too young in '65, so were you, but we're not too young now. we must maintain what they won in '65. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> does romney like you? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. on the way to denver. let me start with this brand new nbc/wall street journal poll out tonight. what it shows in addition to an obama leading that's hardening is a deep concern that mitt romney said about that 47% of the country he says can't be counted on to meet its responsibility. it's that part of the country that romney has dismissed as free-loaders, moochers, takers. people, especially veteran families, people retired on social security, regular americans, that is, don't like being dismissed that way, injury added by insult. i'm joined by chuck todd and howard fineman with "the huffington post." the latest poll shows among likely voters the president leads 49% to 46% for romney. that's down net two points from two weeks ago when the pres
these claims. >> probably one of the last groups of people you would think about having voting rights. civil rights groups with battling it out in florida to make sure former felons can vote. now, that's what i call a test drive. silverado! the most dependable, longest lasting, full-size pickups on the road. so, what do you think? [ engine revs ] i'll take it. [ male announcer ] it's chevy truck month. now during chevy truck month, get 0% apr financing for 60 months or trade up to get the 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition with a total value of $8,000. hurry in before they're all gone! it's called passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. so does aarp, serving americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp dicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. to find out more, call today. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have
. this is a civil lawsuit, which means fines not jail time, if they're convicted of this? >> right. so you know, the only major sort of trial that's come from the wall street meltdown happened in 2009 when two bear sterns hedge fund managers were found not guilty of inflating the price of their mortgage-backed securities. really that is the big criticism here. h who is paying the price? jp morgan is trying to distance itself from this, stregs that the lawsuit deals with bear sterns. that's understandable. securities in question, they were issued long before it bought bear, in 2006 and 2007. jp morgan is still planning to contest these allegations with jp morgan saying it's disappointed that the attorney general pursued its civil action without offering us an opportunity to rebut these claims. >> probably one of the last groups of people you would think about having voting rights. civil rights groups with battling it out in florida to make sure former felons can vote. now, that's what i call a test drive. silverado! the most dependable, longest lasting, full-size pickups on the road. so, what do
laws because it opens businesses up to frivolous lawsuits, because we already have civil rights legislation to take care of anti-discrimination law. they don't usually come out and say it's about freedom, it's a business's right to pay women less for equal work. romney may not support todd akin but we should ask him hough he feels about this legislation that todd akin, if he's elected, will be voting on. >> this is one race the republicans early on are expected to win. john cornyn saying he doesn't think it's winnable. can akin win this race? >> i think it's possible. missouri is one of the only swing states that mccain still polled out last time when he lost ohio and other places. there's been a lot of improvement in the polls but neither candidate has ever moved very far past 50%. so that tells you that even with everything jamming up the system, this is a close race. >> but he apologized once for his remark about women, legitimate rape. and now he has come out of -- saying employers shouldn't have to pay women the same money in the workplace. >> so often the defense is -- we
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
decisions of our time in july the justices returned from their break and begin a new term dominated by civil rights issues. joining me from the supreme court, nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete, we're talking about major cases that will reshape potentially reshape policy for the united states on affirmative action, voting rights, and on gay marriage. >> very much so. let's begin with affirmative action president the court will hear that case next week. every selective university in america uses it in some manner to achieve a racially diverse campus. this is a case from the university of texas. a young high school student there did not qualify automatically as the top 10% of graduates in texas do for admission, so she was looked at in in the remainder of the other 25% of the class, race is a factor, says that's unconstitutional. nine years ago the supreme court gave the green light to colleges to use affirmative action if there were no race neutral methods to get to diversity. the question is whether the court has changed and become more conservative when they look at it they
's" top five. in 1962, 29-year-old veteran named james meredith took a giant step for civil rights when he became the first black student at the university of mississippi. at the time segregation was still the norm across much of the south. mississippi's governor and lt. governor had lock mr.ed james meredith from enrollment not once but three times. then a federal court stepped in and gave the okay. thousands of white stiewntsdz and others responded with large scale riots. tear glass filled the air at least two people died. u.s. marshals surrounded the student as he walked across campus to his first day of class now, the machine different story. minorities make up 24% of the student body and there is a statue to the man who changed ole miss forever 50 years ago today and no you know the news for this monday, october the 1st, 2012 i'm shepard smith. we're back tom
states and this showdown in michigan to the civil rights movement. she says she is doing everything she can to get people to support prop 2. >> hey, are you a registered voter? do you know about this initiative? do you have a car? do you need a ride to the polls? i'm just excited because this is like that american fight, like they were fighting in the '60s. >> reporter: terry bowman is just as passionate. he's worked for ford at this parts plant outside detroit for 16 years. he's a member of the united auto workers union, but he thinks giving unions more power by changing the state constitution is a bad idea. especially in a state with high unemployment that's trying to attract newbusinesses. >> no corporation's going to want to come to michigan. it's going to guarantee an adverse aerial relationship right from the minute they come into the state. >> vote yes. >> reporter: both sides are getting support from outside the state, flooding the airways with commercials. >> don't let them hijack our constitution. >> reporter: dawson bell has been covering michigan politics for the "detroit fr
in florida but around the country? and all of the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand your ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone, they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed, and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators -- we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> alright, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan. and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in l
. >> he takes legislation that wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill and in an in tant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very, very, very much. >> chris: last week, caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall and made clear he made johnson come alive for many reader. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look at what he is doing now. >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power but as we turn to the final book he is writing now, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams that are the destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish this last book? >> well, sure. but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four years but why would you believe me?
weekly standard" would agree. when we look at civil rights, it should be not about the quality of results. it might reflect that there is a republican primary going on, or it might reflect the fact that they are failing the same journalistic standards. i think this varies over time. that is just a false logic. i do not know that it is 3 to 1, and i do not know the time you're talking about. some of that is republicans criticizing other republicans. it is certainly not three to one on our side. other questions? we have two here, if we can get the microphone over to the table in front of the cameras. i am keeping her hopping here. >> i am michael, and given what we have just heard about people choosing to believe their side or their candidate or their team of people that believe they are objective journalists, and i count myself among them, and i do not believe that many voters believe that being a liar is a disqualifying traits. what are you guys seeing? what can happen on the ground because of fact checking? >> kathleen alluded to this earlier. there is some modification in behavior. i ha
the supreme court is set to take up a slew of cases some dealing with civil rights following the blockbuster decisions we all watched last term, involving immigration and president obama's health care law. shannon bream now with the news from washington. shannon? >> monday kicks off the brand new term in the supreme court and there are a number of controversial disputes awaiting the justices. at least six of nine justices attended the traditional pre-term red mass in washington on sunday, a tradition started back in 1928 in new york, praers for wisdom and inspiration for all members of the judiciary. on monday the court will consider whether nigeria citizens can sue shell oil company in u.s. court for human rights abuses they say the company committed in nigeria, one of the most anticipated, student who she was not admitted to the university because of race based. and justice kennedy will be the swing vote in that case and expected to take up one case related to same sex marriage and defense of marriage act which the obama administration says it will no longer defend in court. another appeal
released audiotapes that show kennedy's real views on the civil rights movement, cuban missile crisis and george romney. all of that when "now" starts in a mere 180 seconds. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing what you know. let's do it grandpa. that's why humana agents will sit down with you, to listen and understand what's important to you. it's how we help you choose the right humana medicare plan for you. because when your medicare is taken care of, you can spend more time sharing your passions. wow. [ giggles ] [ male announ
civil rights. when you define liberal and conservative, people support medicare with all their hearts and they do like this stuff, they like that we have a mixed capitalism with some social welfare mixed in to soften it and that makes them practical people and makes them liberal in a sense of functionality but not, i'm a liberal. your thoughts? >> you know, i agree. chris, two things have happened over the course of the last 20, 30 years. you have this slow turning away from the ideas of the new deal, at least from other people. the notions that these are ha handouts when it applies to other people, just by default, any democratic that gets elected, it was illegitimate. and then clinton comes along, he's ichlt llegit. >> he did win and i would think that there was this notion that bill clinton was inherently illegitimate and nothing too extreme to dislodge him from the white house because he was de-facto illegitimate. and i think with barack obama, this notion that this could not have happened. this was a nightmare inflicted on us by a.c.o.r.n. >> you are so funny. you have the cartoo
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